Articles tagged with: prevention

Live Better, We've Got Your Back

Spinal Health Week 19-25 May

Live Better, We've Got Your Back

Spinal Health Week 19-25 May

 

The month of May promotes the launch of the theme for Spinal Health Week (May 19-25) "Live Better, We’ve Got Your Back", a national initiative of the CAA. Spinal health week encourages the general population to take control of their healthcare and improve their postural fitness.

Swim for your back pain while our Olympians swim for gold

Swimming is great for easing back pain

With the London Olympics finally here, Aussies will be reminded why as well as being one of our favourite pastimes, swimming is a fantastic way for people of all ages to keep fit and stay healthy. Incorporating almost every muscle and joint of the body, swimming offers something no other aerobic exercise does: the ability to undertake a whole-body workout under low-impact conditions and as a result, protect your muscles and joints from unnecessary stress and strain.

Whether it’s up to your knees or up to your neck, the water bears a considerable proportion of your body’s weight, making the odd paddle particularly beneficial for individuals recovering from injury or suffering from stiff and painful joints associated with arthritis. Movement of the entire body against the resistance of the water increases muscle tone and strength, burns kilojoules and enhances cardiovascular and respiratory endurance.

Improve your health, improve your golf handicap!

Golf swing can be particularly hazardous to the body

The golf swing can be particularly hazardous to the body if done incorrectly and therefore it is vital to ensure stabilisation of the spine is occurring in order to reduce the likeliness of injury.

These days, our more sedentary approach to life on the whole has contributed to a general lack of flexibility and stabilisation of our musculoskeletal system - key factors in improving your game and reducing your pain. The golf swing incorporates nearly every joint between the tips of the toes and the ends of the fingers, so it’s really no surprise that even just one poorly functioning area may be the thing holding you back from that single-figure handicap!  Any restriction in the motion and stability of your body’s joints ultimately shifts the workload to other, healthier joints, causing compensatory strain and increasing the likelihood of injury. It may even be costing you that birdie on the 9th hole!

Minimise the Recurrence of Low Back Injury, Reduce Pain and Gain Long-Term Improvement!

Acute low back pain

Back pain - it’s one of the most prevalent and costly musculoskeletal conditions in regard to treatment and disability, with costs estimated at around $9 billion per year in Australia.  The ever-growing costs are largely a result of the high recurrence of such injury and the simple fact that at least 10% of sufferers go on to develop chronic, disabling back pain.

 

Chiropractic, and the spinal maintenance care it can offer, is a clinical intervention that may prevent these recurrences of back pain. Public health experts today are now turning their attention to the expected recurrence of back pain, as well as its prevention, in an effort to curb the growing epidemic of such conditions.

Breathe well, live well!

Breathe well, live well!

Perfect abdominal breathing is readily observed in the newborn but unfortunately as we age, tension and stress in our day-to-day lives restrict this preferred pattern, resulting in a chronic and largely detrimental pattern of breathing. 

And we thought breathing was one thing we couldn’t get wrong!

When we breathe, the diaphragm relaxes and contracts in order to inhale and exhale respectively (this can be easily seen by the rising and falling of the abdomen when we breathe).  When an individual is under stress however, either emotional or physical, their breathing pattern changes.  Typically, we take shallow breaths using our chest and shoulders, rather than our diaphragm, in order to move air in and out of our lungs, which gradually causes the body to automatically breathe into the neck and shoulders and not correctly into the abdomen.

Age is not a number, but more a determinant of whether we are "nimble on our feet"

Grandmother and boy chiropractic

At the risk of a potential domino effect, I ask 170 retirees to stand on one leg. For those that already aren't too wobbly, I ask them to close their eyes. The room sways... and is soon followed by much laughter.

Last week I was asked to speak to a Probus group at the Castle Hill Community Centre. This is a group of active retirees keen to learn more about themselves, and maintain a fulfilling and active lifestyle. After the laughter settles I discuss the seriousness of not having the ability to maintain posture and balance. One in three adults over the age of 65 suffers from a fall each year and 10% of these falls lead to a significant injury resulting in hospitalisation. Of these, up to 80% do not go home! There is now a slight look of shock amongst the group.

Touchscreen technology and posture

A recent press release from Gartner, talks about how touchscreen technology has been present in various industrial applications for over 20 years, and that

“Multitouch on smartphones and the Apple iPhone phenomenon have shown users how useful touch can be with the right implementation, and Apple's introduction of the larger iPad has set off a wave of speculation about changing the industry.”

With an increasing use of touchscreen technology in daily life, as well as the work place, it is important to consider your posture, and to ensure that you are not over-doing it, when it comes to sitting or standing in the right position for extended periods.

Flat Head Syndrome and Chiropractic

An article in The Sunday Telegraph this weekend entitled “Beware baby’s bassinet” has hopefully brought attention to the fact that a child’s sleeping position may have serious consequences. The article notes that “Plagiocephaly, better known as Flat Head Syndrome, occurs when a baby’s head flattens due to continual pressure on their soft skulls”. The problem has been more noticeable since parents have been advised to put babies to sleep on their back.